Canada’s going black and white for NET Cancer Day!

November 10 is World NET Cancer Day, a day set aside to raise awareness of neuroendocrine cancer, the uncommon disease that I’ve been fighting for the past six years. It’s our day to be heard by decision makers, health professionals and the general public. In addition to raising awareness, we want to encourage more funds for research, treatments, and patient support; and to advocate for equal access to care and treatment for NETS patients around the world.

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Zebra stripes symbolize how this rare cancer can go undetected for many years. Medical students are taught when hearing hoofbeats, to think of horses, not zebras. Neuroendocrine tumours are difficult to diagnose. Though they are the fastest growing class of cancers worldwide, their symptoms are usually vague and similar to more common health problems.  Many family doctors have never encountered a NETs patient. When presented with symptoms like stomach pain and diarrhea, they naturally think of things like Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Crohn’s Disease or lactose intolerance. They think of horses, not zebras. As a result, NETs is frequently misdiagnosed.

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It would appear, however, that through the tireless efforts of NETs patients and advocates, we’re beginning to be heard. This year on November 10, the following landmarks across Canada are lighting up in black and white for NET Cancer Day!

  • City Hall  –  Vancouver, British Columbia
  • High Level Bridge  –  Edmonton, Alberta
  • Calgary Tower  –  Calgary, Alberta
  • City Hall  –  Lethbridge, Alberta
  • CN Tower  –  Toronto, Ontario
  • City Hall Towers  –  Toronto, Ontario
  • Niagara Falls  –  Niagara Falls, Ontario
  • Hamilton Signature Sign  –  Hamilton, Ontario
  • Tower of Olympic Stadium (Parc Olympique)  –  Montreal, Quebec

If you’re near one of these locations on Sunday, I hope you’ll stop, take a photo, and post it on social media with the hashtag #LetsTalkAboutNETs @cnetscanada. Every bit of exposure helps raise awareness and may contribute to someone getting a quicker diagnosis.

 

 

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